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Survival-Quiz Book

  • Can you catch plague just by standing next to someone who has it?
  • How many inches of concrete do you need between you and radioactive fallout?

The book Who Survives? contains hundreds of questions (and answers) designed to test your survival savvy, while simultaneously teaching you the skills you may lack.

  • Quiz your family, friends, and coworkers.
  • Great for classrooms, meetings, parties, and travel.

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(Enter code TVAC3BF3 at purchase.)

 

In researching these quizzes, I tried to find info from experts who seemed to know what they were talking about, as opposed to the other kind. And I aimed to get multiple confirmations of the facts I’ve included.

Sources I used included Cresson Kearny’s Nuclear Survival Skills, The U.S. Army Survival Manual, The Red Cross, many guides to biological, chemical, natural, and nuclear disasters, many survival and first aid guidebooks, and interviews with experts.

Rick@Survival-Quiz.com

 

Links

No “Happy Ending” as Nuclear Gets Worse

Fukushima plume.

The crisis in Japan is worsening and the threat is spreading worldwide.

Three months after a major earthquake and tsunami triggered a nuclear disaster in Japan, radiation “hot spots” may require the evacuation of areas much further from the damaged Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power facility.

Full nuclear meltdowns occurred at three of the plant’s reactors, and radiation steamed from the plant into the atmosphere while an equally large amount was discharged into the ocean.

As  radiation moves up the food chain, it accumulates. By the time it reaches people who consume this food, the levels are higher than they originally were when the radiation entered the environment.

The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station was hit by several explosions after a devastating earthquake and tsunami damaged its cooling functions.

Radiation is wafting into Tokyo more than 130 miles away. Elevated radiation has been detected across North America and Europe.

Peter Bradford, a former commissioner at the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission said “The best-case scenario at this point is not a good one, not a good one for the public, not a good one for the nuclear industry. There is not going to be a happy ending to this story.”

For details, here is the IAEA EXPERT MISSION TO JAPAN PRELIMINARY SUMMARY. Also, here is the IAEA’s Fukushima Nuclear Accident Update Log.

How to Protect Yourself from Radiation

Knowing how to protect yourself can lessen the devastation from radiation exposure. Here are ideas to help:

You can help others survive by sharing: